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The Psychology Program offers a B.S. in Psychology.

Psychology majors can diversify in other academic areas or enroll in a specific concentration area to prepare for advanced study or delineate a stronger preparation for a career at a baccalaureate level.

Program Director: Joseph Kovach, Psy.D.
Faculty: Barbara Butcher, M.A.; Cheryl Cole, M.A.; Margaret Dust, Ph.D.; Patrick Ellis, M.A.; Tony Franco, Ph.D.; Terry Harman, Ph.D.; Joseph Kovach, Psy.D.; Jacqueline LaFave, Ed.S.; Martha O’Danovich, Psy.D.; Ambrose Resa, Jr., M.A.; James P. Sullivan, Ed.D.; Michael Stasik, Psy.D.; Shaun Wehle, Psy.D.; Stephanie Zoltowski, Psy.D.

  • Mission Statement
  • Objectives
  • Program Director

The mission of the Psychology Program is to develop appropriate skill knowledge and values for students who expect to continue their education at the graduate level or who plan careers in health, education, business, social, or religious work. The goals of the psychology program focus on a wide and diverse range of human experience and behavior related to development, emotion, intellect, learning, personality, normal and abnormal, rehabilitation, and research. This knowledge enables the individual to better understand self and others, to realize unique potentialities more fully, and to enhance one's humaneness as well as to significantly affect behavior.

Upon completion of this program, it is expected that students will:

  • Have a general understanding and appreciation of the role of human behavior, particularly at the individual, familial, organizational and societal levels;
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the biological and conceptual languages of the brain and their potential permutations and combinations, and the ability to apply this knowledge to the creation of new frameworks of thought;
  • Have a general understanding and appreciation of the connection between scientific inquiry and the creative and artistic dimensions in the field of psychology; and
  • Be able to engage in ethical analysis of the profession problems in light of the Code of Professional Ethics outlined by the American Psychological Association.
Joseph Kovach
Joseph Kovach





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Program Requirements


  • B.S.
  • Minor
  • Courses

B.S. in Psychology (120 hours)

The following are required for a baccalaureate degree:

  • 54 hours: General Education

  • 10 hours: Requisites for the Major
    PSYC 210 Research for Behavioral Sciences
    PSYC 217 Careers in Psychology
    PSYC 230 Statistics for Behavioral Sciences
    PSYC 260 Psychological Testing

  • 27 hours: Upper Level Courses in Major
    PSYC 315 Personality Psychology
    PSYC 335 Abnormal Psychology
    PSYC 351 Brain and Behavior
    PSYC 495 Field Instruction
    PSYC 499 Senior Seminar
    PSYC _____
    PSYC _____
    PSYC _____
    PSYC _____

  • 27 hours: Electives

Minor in Psychology (18 hours)

The following courses are required:

PSYC 210 Research for Behavioral Sciences
PSYC 230 Statistics for Behavioral Sciences
PSYC 260 Psychological Testing
PSYC _____
PSYC _____
PSYC _____

PSY 100 Introduction to Psychology
3 hours
This course surveys the field of psychology. Fundamental concepts of the discipline drawn from experimentation and research are stressed. Social psychology, personality, abnormal psychology, development, learning, memory, and perception are studied to provide the student with a basis for further study of psychology and for applying the tools and methods of psychology to everyday living.

PSY 210 Research Methodology
3 hours
This course includes training in laboratory procedures and research methodology to provide the individual student with the opportunity to pursue the field of psychology from an empirical point of view. The student will be expected to design, implement, and construct a formal report on a research topic.
Prerequisites: PSY 100, ENGL 103 and 104 or permission of program director.

PSY 217 Careers in Psychology
1 hour
The course is designed to help the student evaluate if Psychology is the correct career choice. Career opportunities in Psychology and related fields will be explored. Emerging areas will also be discussed.

PSY 230 Statistics for Behavioral Science
3 hours
This course serves as an introduction to the fundamentals of modern statistics. Topics to be considered include the following: descriptive statistics, frequency distribution, measures of variation, probability and decision-making, problems of estimation and tests of hypotheses, linear regression and correlation. Emphasis will be placed on the interpretation and application of statistical analysis in the social sciences. (formerly PSY 380.)
Prerequisite: MATH 103.

PSY 260 Psychological Testing
3 hours
Students will make intensive studies of many of the more frequently employed testing instruments with emphasis on the theory and problems involved in the measurement of psychological variables. Attention is given to the principles involved in the selection and use of intelligence, achievement, interest, aptitude, and personality tests. (formerly PSY 450.) Lab Fee.
Prerequisites: PSY 100 and PSY 230 or permission of program director.

PSY 300 Educational Psychology
3 hours
This course surveys the physical, emotional, social, moral, and mental development of children from infancy to adulthood and the psychological principles involved in learning.
Prerequisite: PSY 100 or EDU 200-210
Cross-Listed: EDUC 300

PSY 310 Psychology of Adjustment
3 hours
Students will explore the adjustive demands placed on individuals in a world of moral, philosophical, and technological change. Adjustment is defined as "the ability to select appropriate and effective measures of meeting the demands of the environment while maintaining a healthy attitude toward the circumstances."
Motivation, learning, stress, interpersonal relationships, intellect, and emotion are investigated with other emerging modes of adjustment. (formerly PSY 310.)
Prerequisite: PSY 100 or permission of program director.

PSY 312 Interviewing Techniques
3 hours
This course examines the subject of interviewing and skills necessary to become a good interviewer. Interviewing as it applies to many aspects of life will be examined. General interviewing skills will be learned and applied to several settings. Part of the focus will be on resumes and job interviews, the other part will focus on interviewing and interrogation in the criminal justice setting.
Cross-listed: CRIJ 312

PSY 315 Personality Psychology
3 hours
This course deals with the biological and psychological foundations of personality as they emerge in the theories set forth by pioneers and contemporaries in the field. Special emphasis is placed on contemporary theorists and the application of their contributions to an understanding of the normal personality.
Prerequisites: PSY 100 and 210 or permission of program director.

PSY 320 Social Psychology
3 hours
The course provides a unified view of the field of social psychology organized around the concepts of social influence and power and exchange in social life and explores in-depth human thoughts, feelings, and actions as influenced by other people. Specific topics include socialization, perception of self and others, pro-social and anti-social behavior, attitudes, interpersonal attraction, social influence, and group behavior.
Prerequisites: PSY 100 and 210 or permission of program director.

PSY 325 Forensic Psychology
3 hours
This course examines police, court, and correctional aspects of forensic psychology. It attempts to understand how psychologists impact the research, practice, and policy of crime, law, and justice. Case illustrations are used to understand each area. Timely issues and controversies are presented. The adult, juvenile, family, and civil aspects of forensic psychology are reviewed.
Cross-listed: CRIJ 325

PSY 326 Sports Psychology
3 hours
Student athletes will develop insight and principles of the psychology of sports by examining fundamental ideas, supported by research literature, that apply to athletic performance. Students will examine the behavior of sport and exercise participants such as: role of self-confidence and goal setting; and effectiveness of behavioral and cognitive intervention in sport. Strategies will include: coping, relaxation, imagery, hypnotism, energizing, and psychological-skills training.
Pre-requisites: PSY 100, ENGL 103 or permission of program director.

PSY 335 Abnormal Psychology
3 hours
This course blends theory, application, history, and science as they apply to understanding and treating the psychological behavior of deviant individuals. Case studies are employed to document and illustrate various pathologies and their treatment. Social consequences of psychopathology are also confronted in terms of recent research on deviant personality, which include the areas of alcoholism and drug use.
Prerequisites: PSYC100 and 210 or permission of program director.

PSY 340 Developmental Psychology
3 hours
This survey course explores various factors that influence behavior throughout the life cycle from prenatal issues to death. (formerly PSY 400.)
Prerequisites: PSY 100 and 210 or permission of program director.

PSY 341 Child Psychology
3 hours
The student is given a basic understanding of the development of the child from conception to adolescence. Emphasis is placed on the physical, emotional, social, and moral development of the child. (formerly PSY 410.)
Prerequisites: PSY 100 and 210 or permission of program director.

PSY 342 Psychology of Adolescence
3 hours
This course serves as a study of the nature of adolescents with special reference to their physical, mental, emotional, social, moral and religious problems and development. (formerly PSY 420.)
Prerequisites: PSY 100 and 210 or permission of program director.

PSY 343 Adult Development and Aging
3 hours
The student will explore the aging process from early adulthood to death. Biological, cognitive, social and personality aspects and development will be considered.
Prerequisite: PSY 100 and 210 or permission of program director.

PSY 344 Death and Dying
3 hours
This course is designed to explore the psychological and behavioral aspects of death and dying. The course will facilitate the identification and an in-depth study of current issues in dying and death through projects tailored to the needs and interests of individual students. Lectures, open discussions, media aids, and first-hand observations will expose the student to facts and values of dying and death.
Prerequisite: PSY 100 and 210 or permission of program director.

PSY 345 Industrial Organizational Psychology
3 hours
A survey course discussing the research and theory as it relates to the following topics: personnel, employee motivation and satisfaction, group processes and leadership, and organizational change and development. Human factors of psychology may also be considered. (formerly PSY 445.)
Prerequisites: PSY 100 and 210 or permission of program director.

PSY 351. Brain and Behavior
3 hours
The unique relationship between physiological process and behavior are examined with emphasis upon emotion, learning, and motivation. (formerly PSY 455.)
Prerequisites: PSY 100 and 210 or permission of program director.

PSY 352 Drugs and Behavior
3 hours
The variety of drugs which affect the nervous system and behavior are examined. The physiological and pharmacological bases for the use and misuse of drugs in our society are discussed and historical perspectives are explored.
Prerequisites: PSY 100 and 210 or permission of program director.

PSY 355 Clinical Methods in Psychology
3 hours
The content of this course is geared to the assessment of maladaptive behaviors with emphasis on the principles and techniques involved in helping restore adaptive behaviors of the individual. (formerly PSY 440.)
Prerequisites: PSY 100 and 210 or permission of program director.

PSY 363 Psychology of Religion
3 hours
There exists a unique interaction between psychology and religion. Certain psychological relationships can be seen in religious behaviors. Psychological variables may interact in unique ways within religion, producing observable psychological phenomena. Other topics to be discussed include conversation, faith healing mysticism, guilt, shame, will and self-management and love.
Prerequisite: PSY 100 and 210 or permission of program director.

PSY 495 Field Instruction
1-3 hours
Students will learn to use knowledge of psychology in an actual agency setting under the supervision of experienced agency staff. This course is a laboratory experience to integrate psychological and addiction theory with practice. This course may be repeated for up to a total of 6 credits.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or above required. Application for and approval of the class must be obtained at least one semester before enrollment. See program director.

PSY 496 Topics in Psychology
3 hours
In order to foster students' growth and development, this course will offer topics not specifically listed in the psychology program. These offerings will allow the student to gain additional depth and breadth in their field. Topics to include adult development and aging, death and dying or psychology of religion. Topics courses (but not specific topics) may be repeated for a total of 6 credits.
Prerequisites: PSY 100 and 210 or permission of program director.

PSY 497 Research for Behavioral Sciences
3 hours
As a means to promote scholarship, initiative, and experiential learning to senior students, this course is based on the student's interest. It is a course of independent study, directed reading, and research, the results of which are to be formulated in a research paper. The program director must approve topics for research. This course requires senior status, a cumulative 3.25 index in the major, and the approval of the program director.
Prerequisite: PSY 210, 230, 260.

PSY 499 Senior Seminar in Psychology
3 hours
This capstone course is designed to assist students in the integration and critical examination of the various concepts, theories, and methods of inquiry presented both in general education and the major. Learning outcomes for both the general education program and the major are reviewed. Course assignments assist students in assessing the degree for which learning outcomes have been mastered. Senior standing is required.







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