Academics

Humanities Courses (HUM)      

HUM 300. What are the Humanities?
3 hours
This course surveys the history of Western arts, religion, history and philosophy, with some attention to crucial moments in non-Western civilizations that invite comparison with Western cultures. One meeting is devoted to library resources and technology skills, using assignments on Humanities topics.

HUM 310. Stories: the Question of Self within One's Society (Part I)
3 hours
Everyone has a powerful, innate need to tell and hear stories. Stories are how people share experiences, understand themselves and one another, and create a sense of community. Stories can help to explain customs, identify values, tear down barriers, and disseminate knowledge. This course studies the use and importance in stories to explore how those stories help frame oneself within the context of society.

HUM 310. Stories: the Question of Self within One's Society (Part II)
3 hours
See above.

HUM 320. What Makes Great Art? (Part I)
3 hours
This course explores a variety of art topics, depending on the instructor's and the students' interests. Overall, it introduces students to various characterizations of art and the different ways in which to consider great art. Specific topics could include American Cinema and the History of Art. Other courses could be developed encompassing visual and performing arts topics.

HUM 320. What Makes Great Art? (Part II)
3 hours
See above.

HUM 350. Where or What is My Community? (Part I)
3 hours

This course explores why humans are social by nature. Humans share their humanness with all people, but have unique individual characteristics over which we have no control because of the accident of birth. Humans are born into involuntary communities, a family, a tribal unit, a city, or a state. However, we all have choices as we grow older to establish a new family if we so desire, move where we will, have friends who we want, practice worship or religion as we see fit, engage in business transactions that will bring us material sustenance or wealth. These are our choices but they are limited by our own limitations of social skills and monetary resources.

HUM 350. Where or What is My Community? (Part II)
3 hours
See above.

HUM 400. The God Question (Part I)
3 hours
This course will explore the uncertainties about God. With the development of science and rationalism as the arbiter of all decisions a growing scientific or secular atheism has developed. However, the most dominant Western contemporary attitude is a growing indifference and unconcern, a practical agnosticism. Traditional societies have posited some ultimate concern that dominates the life of the individual and that society as a whole, what some might call a personal or a series of personal gods who influence our lives.

HUM 400. The God Question (Part II)
3 hours
See above.

HUM 410. The Question of Human Crisis and the Meaning of Life (Part I)
3 hours
This class explores experiences of personal crisis--death, sickness, and misfortune--that prompt us to question life's meaning and may cause us to redefine ourselves and our relationship to society. Through a study of classic works of literature, philosophy, art, history, and religion, students will deepen their understanding of the kind of life-changing experiences that set us on the path of philosophical reflection, religious conversion, and self-discovery. Students will survey a variety of answers to the question of life's meaning, from the religious view that life has a transcendental meaning, to the scientific view that life has no intrinsic meaning, to the existentialist idea that the individual creates life's meaning. We will also explore the process of creating meaning and the role of language in that process.

HUM 410. The Question of Human Crisis and the Meaning of Life(Part II)
3 hours
See above.

HUM 420. What Does It Mean to Create? (Part I)
3 hours
This course offers students the opportunity to explore and understand the creative process through their own interests and talents. Students will have the opportunity to learn the principles and techniques of such activities as creative writing, studio art, computer graphics, acting, and oral interpretation. Students will then apply this learning to specific projects

HUM 420. What Does It Mean to Create? (Part II)
3 hours
See above.

HUM 499. Integrative Project (formerly Senior Seminar)
3 hours
This is a capstone course where students will prepare a traditional research paper or a multimedia project (with a written description) and an oral presentation on a topic that is designed to integrate the knowledge and skills from two or more subject areas (i.e. literature, history, philosophy, religion and the arts) in the curriculum. The project and oral presentation will be evaluated by the program director and another faculty member from an appropriate discipline.