Academics

General Science Courses (SCIE)      

Biology | Exercise & Sports Science | Forensic Science | Chemistry | Geology | Physics | Restoration Ecology | Science

 

BIOL 100. Investigative Biology
4 hours
A course focused upon applying sound and responsible biological techniques, to test and assess biological theories and concepts. The course utilizes common laboratory procedures to address questions surfacing from environmental problems to possible criminal activities. Laboratories are focused around answering particular biological questions, including techniques presently applied in DNA fingerprinting and analysis. This course is geared towards the non-science major who will be exposed to applied biological techniques, either in their chosen field of study, or in the work environment. Investigative Biology meets a science with a lab requirement for non-science majors.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 101. Human Biology

4 hours
This course emphasizes human physiology and the role humans play in the biosphere. Bio-ethical issues and application concepts to daily activities and dilemmas are addressed and discussed between student and instructor. Through these activities, it is the goal of this course that each student leave with the understanding of how a normal human being functions. We are often called upon to be responsible for making decisions related to our own bodies' health and the health of the environment that we live in. It is our responsibility to take responsibility for our health, education and careers.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 111. General Biology I
4 hours
This course introduces the student to the concepts of modern biology, focusing on the universal properties and processes of living organisms. Topics include cells, plants and animal structure and function, vertebrate organ systems, evolution, and ecology.
Prerequisite: BIOL 100 or High School Biology
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 112. General Biology II
4 hours
A continuation of Biology 111. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory each week.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 210. Ecology
4 hours
An introduction to the basic principles and fundamentals influencing interactions between plants, animals, and their environment. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory each week.
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 226. Biochemistry
4 hours
A general biochemistry course including the structure and function of biological molecules in metabolism, bioenergetics, and enzyme action. Three hours of lecture and one-three hour laboratory each week.
Prerequisites: CHEM 110-111, BIOL 111 and BIOL112
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 230. Microbiology
4 hours
This course includes a study of the structure, life activities and classification of bacteria and viruses, as well as of parasitic protozoa and helminthes, and fungi together with principles of immunology. Laboratory work includes the methods of culture, isolation and identification of various micro-organisms. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory each week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 111-112 and CHEM 110-111
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 240. Conservation Biology
4 hours
The preservation and conservation of species is dependent upon applying scientific studies focused on rare and endangered species. Keystone habitats and species of many different habitats are discussed, and possible management options are entertained in regard to the value (ethical and economic) of species and habitat diversity.
Prerequisites High school biology or BIOL 100 Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 250. Environmental Dynamics
3 hours
This course addresses the factors effecting natural and man-made environmental conditions. Anthropogenic activities are highlighted as major influences on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Integrated knowledge from ecological theory and conservation biology are the foundations in which to determine the "richness" and degradation of habitats. Economic and political concerns are also highlighted in this course.
Prerequisite: High school biology or BIOL 100. Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 355. Cell Biology
4 hours
A study of cell structure and physiology with emphasis on the roles of cell organelles, cell physiology, transport of materials, homeostatic mechanisms, genetic control, and cell division. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory each week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 111-112, CHEM 110-111, 225-226. Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 385. Genetics
3 hours
An investigation of the principles of inheritance with emphasis on the nature of genetic material, transmission of genetic material, and its manifestation. Adaptation and natural selection are discussed. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory each week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 111-112, CHEM 110-111. Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 497. Research
Hours arranged
By participating in a semester long research program, students can earn credit toward their degree. Some local locations of possible research programs: John G. Shedd Aquarium, Argonne National Laboratories, Loyola University, and Indiana University. See Education program Director for details. Three hours of research activities are required each week for each credit hour enrolled.

BIOL 115. Diversity, Ecology and Behavior
3 hours
Overview of the unity and diversity of life. We attempt to construct a framework for ordering biology by studying both the shared and specialized modifications of organisms that allow them to adapt to their environment. We also apply biological principles to social, medical and environmental issues. Topics include: diversity of life, respiration, photosynthesis, mitosis/meiosis, Mendelian genetics and complications, natural selection, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, population growth (including humans), interactions among populations (competition, predation, parasitism), behavior, and conservation biology.
Prerequisites: SCIE 110 & SCIE 111

BIOL 115L. Diversity, Ecology and Behavior Laboratory
1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for Diversity, Ecology and Behavior Laboratory. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course.
Prerequisites: SCIE 110 & SCIE 111

BIOL 205. Development, Structure and Function of Organisms
3 hours
This course introduces embryonic development and examines the functioning of physiological systems of both plants and animals. The underlying cellular and molecular basis for these processes will be emphasized. In particular, the transport of molecules and small ions through biological membranes will be studied. This will require an understanding of membrane structure, diffusion, electrical potentials and other physical and chemical principles.
Prerequisites: Diversity, Ecology and Behavior

BIOL 205L. Development, Structure and Functionof Organisms Laboratory

1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for the above course Development, Structure and Function of Organisms. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course.
Prerequisites: Diversity, Ecology and Behavior Laboratory. Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 400. Cell Structure and Function
3 hours
This course introduces students to cell biology through 3 over-arching themes: First, the shape and organization of molecules, organelles and cells underlie their function. Second, cellular organization and function require energy, and cells are in part energy-transducing machines. Third, the cell is constantly changing -- its shape, activity and molecular composition are dynamic and transient. Cell biology builds on a foundation of math, chemistry and physics, so we begin by discussing the structure and function of macromolecules and the most relevant principles of chemistry, kinetics and thermodynamics.
Prerequisites: Development, Structure and Function of Organisms

BIOL 400L. Cell Structure and Function Laboratory
1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for the Cell Structure and Function course. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course.
Prerequisites: Development, Structure and Function of Organisms Lab. Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 370. Genetic and Molecular Biology
3 hours
This course covers basic principles of classical genetics, molecular biology, and population genetics. The classical genetics section includes discussions on Mendelian genetics, linkage and meiotic mapping, sex determination, cytoplasmic inheritance, and chromosomal aberrations. The molecular biology section continues with discussions on DNA structure and replication, chromosomal organization, transcription, translation, the genetic code, mutations, DNA repair, and transposable elements. Basic regulatory mechanisms in prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene expression, as well as current developments (recombinant DNA technology, cancer-causing genes, imprinting, developmental genetics) are also presented.
Prerequisites: Cell Structure and Function

BIOL 370L. Genetic and Molecular Biology Laboratory
1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for Genetics and Molecular Biology. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course.
Prerequisites: Cell Structure and Function Lab. Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 405. Ecology and Evolution
3 hours
Evolutionary processes and ecological principles associated with individuals, populations, communities, and ecosystems. Topics include genetic drift, natural selection, adaptation, life tables, population dynamics, competition, predation, biodiversity, and ecological stability, with emphasis on natural systems.
Prerequisites: Genetic and Molecular Biology

BIOL 405L. Ecology and Evolution Laboratory

1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for Ecology and Evolution. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course.
Prerequisites: Genetic and Molecular Biology Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 420. Immunology
3 hours
This course consists of an integrated series of lectures designed to familiarize students with cellular, molecular and biochemical aspects of the development of the immune system and the immune response. The course focuses on the development of the immune system and the function of its major components.
Prerequisites: Cell Biology, Chem I and Chem II

BIOL 420L. Immunology Laboratory
1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for Immunology. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 300. Anatomy and Physiology I
3 hours
First semester of a two-semester sequence dealing with the structure and function of the human body and mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis within it. Includes the study of cells, tissues, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems.
Prerequisites: One year of Chemistry, Cell Structure and Function

BIOL 300L. Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory
1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for Anatomy and Physiology I. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 305. Anatomy and Physiology II
3 hours
Continuation of the study of the structure and function of the human body and the mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis within it. The endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems, as well as the concepts of development, metabolism, fluid and electrolyte balance, and acid-base balance are included.
Prerequisites: Anatomy and Physiology I

BIOL 305L. Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory
1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for Anatomy and Physiology II. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 460. Molecular Biology
3 hours
Designed for students interested in molecular mechanisms by which cellular processes are controlled in eukaryotic cells. Topics include molecular genetic techniques and genomics, structure of genes and chromosomes, transcriptional and translational control of gene expression, signal transduction pathways and gene regulation, the cell cycle, and abnormal regulatory processes in cancer.
Prerequisite: CHEM I and CHEM II, BIOL 1 and BIOL II

BIOL 460L. Molecular Biology Laboratory
1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for Molecular Biology. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 415. Evolution of Behavior
3 hours
An introduction to comparative studies of animal behavior from neuroethological and evolutionary prospective. The first deals with proximate causes of behavior, with emphasis on motor, sensory and central aspects of the nervous system. The second deals with ultimate causes, with emphases on natural selection, natural history, and adaptive aspects of behavior.
Prerequisites: None

BIOL 390. Advanced Microbiology
3 hours
The aim is to give the students insight and practical skills in Microbiology at an advanced level. The course will facilitate a project based learning process during which protocol formulation, safety procedures, tools, methodology, data handling and interpretation will be carried out.
Prerequisites: Microbiology

BIOL 390L. Advanced Microbiology Laboratory
1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for Advanced Microbiology. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 410. Ecology and Evolution
3 hours
This course introduces current concepts and principles of ecology and evolution. Animal behavior, populations, communities, ecosystems, biogeography, natural selection, speciation, the history of life, human evolution, and other topics will be studied through lectures, readings, discussion, and a field trip.
Prerequisites: Evolution of Behavior

Exercise and Sport Science Courses (EXSS)

EXSS 105. Beginning Bowling
1 hour
This course is designed to help students acquire the fundamental skills of bowling including form and technique. Students will also learn the terminology, rules, strategies and scoring procedures. The course involves lectures, demonstration, and practice time.
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EXSS 110. Running Techniques
1 hour
Provides the student with a knowledge of coaching theory, methods and strategies. This knowledge is applied to track, field and cross country. The intent of this course is to apply the skills, theories and methods needed to coach track and field at all levels. Track, field and cross country are analyzed for individual form and techniques as well as team effort.

EXSS 125. Tennis Techniques
1 hour
Provides the student with a knowledge of coaching theory, methods and strategies. The coaching of tennis includes instruction in fundamental skills, strategies, coaching techniques, individual analysis by use of student participation, demonstrations and video presentations. Organization, administration, scoring, equipment, budgeting, scheduling and other aspects of tennis are included in the course.

EXSS 115. Beginning Martial Arts
1 hour
Basic movements, history, philosophy, and concepts of a martial art. Learning the martial art through its practice.

EXSS 120. Beginning Self-Defense
1 hour
This course is intended to increase students awareness and understanding of sexual assault. Focus will be placed on defense against sexual violence that is most often directed towards women, and increasingly men, in our culture. Techniques for diffusing or avoiding potentially dangerous situations will be examined. Such techniques include verbal, nonverbal, physical and psychological responses. Physical self-defense skills include evasions, blocks, counterattacks and other defenses against common attacks. The concept of unlearning "victim-like" thinking and behaviors will also be examined. The course will entail lecture, discussion, and participation.


EXSS 130. Beginning Yoga

1 hour
This course will explore the beginning aspects of Yoga.


EXSS 200. Certified Personal Trainer

2 hours
This course will prepare students in the processes, theories and application of being a personal trainer. This course will provide the content necessary for students to sit for the national certification exam.
Prerequisites: Fitness Assessment


EXSS 215. Survey of Physical Education Health

3 hours
This course will provide an overview of all facets of sports including management, career opportunities, marketing and promotion, public relations fund raising, and event and facilities management. Several factors combine to make sports administration a growing and important area of study. The need for qualified administrators in the field increases rapidly.

EXSS 435. Kinesiology

3 hours
A neuropsychological study of movement that integrates the central and peripheral nervous system mechanisms with those of the muscular system. These principles are applied to promoting the enhancement of skill acquisition and human performance. Dysfunctions affecting neuromuscular function are also studied.
Prerequisites: Principles of Conditioning


EXSS 435L. Kinesiology Laboratory

1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for Kinesiology. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.


EXSS 496. Sports Law

3 hours
This course covers various individual and non-professional sports law issues and focuses on the regulation of interscholastic, intercollegiate, and Olympic sports. Topics covered include tort law, contract law, Title IX gender discrimination, the relationship between the college athlete and university, drug testing of amateur athletes, the regulatory authority of the NCAA, and the rules and regulations pertaining to "amateurism" and use of agents.


EXSS 410. First Responder

2 hours
This course prepares students to attain their certification in CPR and other life saving interventions.


EXSS 425. Individual Fitness

1 hour
The development of teaching units and lesson plans, construction of objectives, use of expert curriculum sources, assessment of knowledge, dispositions, and performance through indicators.
Prerequisites: Kinesiology


EXSS 420. Group Fitness

1 hour
The development of teaching objectives, unit plans for team sports, assessment of skills and field experience in using the skills developed in this course. Students are given the opportunity to master and teach specific sports skills.
Prerequisites: Kinesiology


EXSS 415. Fitness Assessment

3 hours
Designed to give the student a foundation in the process of assessment (tests and measurement). The course includes the development of objectives/ outcomes, test construction, use of formative and summative evaluation, norm and criterion referenced measures, elementary statistics and the use of other evaluative materials specific to health and kinesiology.
Prerequisites: Kinesiology and Group or Individual Fitness


EXSS 400. Principles of Conditioning

3 hours
Lecture, discussion and laboratory course introducing athletic training and kinesiology students to basic procedures and philosophies of athletic training. Students gain knowledge of the basic science relationship to the prevention and care of, and recovery from athletic injuries. Students will begin practicing fundamental skills and orient themselves to the athletic training and coaching settings.
Prerequisites: Fitness Assessment

EXSS 400L. Kinesiology Laboratory
1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for Principles of Conditioning. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

EXSS 405. Field Experience in Exercise and Sports Science
3 hours
Individual off-campus laboratory or field experiences that provide valuable, supervised practical experience.
Prerequisites: Department Approval

EXSS 440. Physiology of Sport

3 hours
Learning and practice of mental skills and their application to enhance performance in domains such as athletics, performing arts and business. Analysis of cognitive-behavioral intervention strategies for performance enhancement across skill levels and different sports. Psychological aspects of peak performance.

Forensic Science (FRSC)

FRSC 200. Forensic Science Survey
3 hours
Survey of the forensic sciences with emphasis on criminalistics; unique characteristics, underlying philosophies; nature, analytical methods, significance of results with chemical, biological, trace, pattern evidence.

FRSC 200L. Forensic Science Survey Laboratory
1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for Forensic Science Survey. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

FRSC 300. Forensic Biology
3 hours
Students will learn how to collect, transport and analyze blood samples. They will become acquainted with legally definable methods of labeling, tracking samples and sample analysis. Familiarity with chain of custody procedures will ensure that students understand the process of being an expert witness. This course will also cover physiological fluid identification and DNA typing.
Prerequisites: Forensic Science Survey.

FRSC 300L. Forensic Biology Laboratory

1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for Forensic Biology. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course. Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

FRSC 305. Forensic Professional Practice
3 hours
Sophomore standing and permission. A structured practical experience under the supervision of a forensic science professional.

FRSC 310. Forensic Science Case Work
3 hours
In-depth training for casework analysis in a specific forensic discipline (e.g. drug identification, DNA typing, fingerprint comparisons) in an approved forensic science laboratory.
Prerequisites: Department Approval

FRSC 315. Forensic Biology Internship
1-3 hours
A supervised external full-time internship at a pre-approved facility. Students will be exposed to forensic analysis in an operational forensic laboratory and will be evaluated by the forensic science program external internship committee and the sponsoring forensic laboratory. Credit will depend on number of hours in the internship, with a minimum of 100 hours.
Prerequisites: Department Approval

Chemistry Courses (CHEM)

CHEM 110. General Chemistry
3 hours
Designed for students in health-related majors as well as those seeking to fulfill general education requirements. It provides an introduction to organic and biological chemistry and the principles that govern them. The course will focus on the interrelatedness of all these areas as well as their practical applications to health science and environmental issues. Satisfies the science with a lab general education requirement. Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

CHEM 200. Chemistry I
3 hours
An introduction to the chemical nature and properties of inorganic compounds. Topics presented include atomic and molecular structures, inorganic nomenclature, states of matter, properties of gases and solutions, acids/bases and salts, chemical equilibrium, nuclear and chemical reactions. Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

CHEM 200L. Chemistry I Laboratory
1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for Chemistry I. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course. Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

CHEM 225. Survey of Organic Chemistry
4 hours
An introduction to the chemistry of hydrocarbons and their principle derivatives. Laboratory experience in the preparation and properties of organic molecules with some biological emphasis. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory each week.
Prerequisites: CHEM 110, and CHEM 111 or equivalent. Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

CHEM 300. Biochemistry
3 hours
A general biochemistry course including the structure and function of biological molecules in metabolism, bioenergetics, and enzyme action.
Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory each week.
Prerequisite: CHEM 225. Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

CHEM 300L. Biochemistry Laboratory
1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for biochemistry. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course. Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

CHEM 240. Quantitative Analysis
4 hours
The theory and applications of classical and instrumental analytical methods. Unknowns are quantitatively assayed using gravimetric, volumetric, electroanalytical, and spectrometric methods.
Prerequisites: CHEM 110-111 and MATH 103. Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

CHEM 205. Chemistry II
3 hours
An introduction to the fundamental principles of chemistry, including chemical stoichiometry; the properties of gases, liquids, and solids; solutions; chemical equilibria; atomic and molecular structure; an introduction to thermodynamics; reaction kinetics; and a discussion of the chemical properties of selected elements.
Prerequisites: Chem I

CHEM 205L. Chemistry II Laboratory
1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for Chemistry II. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

CHEM 310. Organic Chemistry II
3 hours
Organic Chemistry II builds upon the relationship between the structure of organic compounds, the physical properties defined by these structures, and the manner in which we can manipulate materials by chemical synthesis. We will investigate methods for structural identification, expand your knowledge of synthetic methods, and discuss in more depth biological species. You are responsible for remembering lessons described in Organic Chemistry I regarding chemical structure, properties, bonding, stereochemistry, reactions, and reaction mechanisms.
Prerequisites: Organic Chem I

CHEM 310L. Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for Organic Chemistry II. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

CHEM 430. Instrumentation Analysis
4 hours
This course is designed to give the students a broad experience in the theory of instrumentations. The labs will be investigative in nature where students are required to use the Internet and the Chemical literature to explore practical ways of using instruments for solving chemical problems qualitatively and quantitively. The students will survey the theory and application of instruments such as: visible, ultra violet, Infra red, Fluorescence, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Atomic absorption, Chromatography, and Mass Spectrometry.
Prerequisites: Organic Chem

CHEM 430L. Instrumentation Analysis Laboratory
1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for Instrumentation Analysis. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course.

Geology Courses (GEOL)

GEOL 100. Physical Geology
4 hours
This course is a survey of physical geology. Topics covered in the three hours of weekly lectures include: plate tectonics, volcanoes, earthquakes and mountain building, the rock cycle, weathering and erosion, mass wasting, stream landscapes and flooding, wind processes, shoreline erosion and deposition. The weekly laboratory period includes the study of typical rocks and minerals, topographic maps and survey systems, and an introduction to aerial photographic interpretation. A geological field experience included.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

GEOL 110. Earth and Space Science
4 hours
This course will introduce the student to the sciences of astronomy, geology, meteorology, and oceanography. This course includes a laboratory component.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

Physics Courses (PHYS)

PHYS 110. Mechanical Universe I
3 hours
A non-calculus approach to the physics of everyday life that covers the principles of mechanics, heat, waves, and forces using a non-calculus approach. Lab covers scientific experiments and observations that enhance an understanding of mechanics, heat, waves and forces. Field trips may be substituted for regularly scheduled lab sessions.
Prerequisite: MATH 103 or equivalent. Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

PHYS 110L. Mechanical Universe Laboratory
1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for mechanical universe. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course. Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

PHYS 300. Physics I
3 hours
This basic course deals with first-course subject matter including mechanics, electricity, magnetism, wave motion and light. Included is an introduction to modern physics. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory each week.
Prerequisite: MATH 104 Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

PHYS 300L. Physics I Laboratory
1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for biochemistry. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course. Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

PHYS 305. Physics II
3 hours
A continuation of Physics I. Three hours of lecture and one three hour laboratory each week.
Prerequisite: PHYS 221, MATH 104 Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

PHYS 305L. Physics II Laboratory
1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for Physics II. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course. Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

Restoration Ecology (RSEC)

RSEC 200. Restoration Ecology
3 hours
This course is intended as a broad overview of restoration ecology. During the first part of the course we will focus on using knowledge of ecosystem functioning to facilitate the recovery of damaged ecosystems. During the second half of the course we will discuss topics related to the implementation of restoration projects such as planning, evaluating success, legislation, and financing. These two approaches will be integrated through the discussion of case studies.
Prerequisites: Conservation Biology

RSEC 200L. Restoration Ecology Laboratory
1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for Restoration Ecology. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

RSEC 212. Environmental Law
3 hours
This course examines the philosophical foundations, common law roots, and constitutional frame-work of U.S. environmental law. Major statutes dealing with endangered species, clean air, clean water, environmental impact assessment, and hazardous waste cleanup are examined together with the statutory objectives and regulatory strategies of these efforts and their relative effectiveness. Specific topics include decision-making in the face of scientific uncertainty, the role of cost–benefit analysis, and the relative distribution of environmental burdens and pursuit of environmental justice. Alternatives to conventional regulatory approaches are presented as well.

RSEC 300. Public Policy
3 hours
This course provides an overview of public policy in America with an environmental focus. It examines the impact of environmental laws on government decision-making, including administrative law issues, comprehensive transportation planning, the National Environmental Policy Act, historic preservation, parkland protection, the Coastal Zone Management Act, wetlands protection, farmland protection, the Endangered Species Act and other wildlife issues, mitigation of environmental impacts, role of governmental policies relating to the environment, legislative issues, and state environmental laws.

Science Courses (SCIE)

SCIE 110. The Logic of Science
3 hours
This course is an introduction to the nature and philosophy of scientific discovery. It covers the central concepts of scientific discovery and the tools utilized by scientists in the process of making of various revolutionary discoveries. The historical implications of these discoveries are interpreted and related to modern discoveries. Students will travel across time and perform the classic experiments that revolutionized how we view the world. Learning to think as a scientist both from an empirical and a philosophical perspective provides students with entrée into the nature of the scientific enterprise. (Students enrolled in this course must also enroll in the SCIE 111.)

SCIE 110L. The Logic of Science Lab
1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for the Logic of Science course. SCIE 111 must be taken concurrently with SCIE 110. Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

SCIE 250. Integrated Science I
3 hours
This course explores topics in physical and biological sciences through an integrated approach. In addition, an in-depth study will be conducted of current science research from the scientific, social, and ethical perspectives. The laboratory component SCIE 251 must be taken concurrently with SCIE 250.
Prerequisite: MATH 102 or equivalent, ENGL 103-104