The Accounting Program offers a B.S., and an A.S., in Accounting. The program is committed to providing a wide range of tools necessary for successful admission to graduate school. The program seeks to develop professional and practical scholarship through exploration of fundamental and contemporary concerns, including those dealing with ethical issues. Such an education provides the graduate with a background suited to meeting the needs of a challenging job market.

Department Chair: Roy Scheive, Ed.D.

Program Director: George Grzesiowski, MBA, CPA

Faculty: George Grzesiowski, M.B.A., C.P.A.; Deanne Shimala, C.P.A., M.S.T.

Mission Statement

In support of the College mission, the Accounting Department is comprised of creative, highly qualified professionals dedicated to preparing our students for entry-level opportunities and longterm career success, providing a fulfilling experience for members of our faculty, and making meaningful contributions to the professional and academic communities we serve.

The Accounting Program offers a B.S., and an A.S., in Accounting. The program is committed to providing a wide range of tools necessary for successful admission to graduate school. The program seeks to develop professional and practical scholarship through exploration of fundamental and contemporary concerns, including those dealing with ethical issues. Such an education provides the graduate with a background suited to meeting the needs of a challenging job market.

The Bachelor of Science in Accounting will put you on a career path to work for local, national, or international accounting and consulting firms. Opportunities are also available in business, higher education, government agencies, and not-for-profit organizations. Students may also choose to earn an Associate of Science degree for quick entry into the workforce and a foundation for further education, or to minor in Accounting as a supplement to another CCSJ major.

Objectives

Upon completion of this program, it is expected that students will:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of current accounting principles, tax law, current auditing standards, and the use of accounting information by management.

  2. Develop critical thinking, problem solving, and communication skills.

  3. Apply accounting theory in a practical manner.

  4. Demonstrate technology skills necessary to solve accounting problems.

  5. Meet the requirements for entry-level careers in accounting such as auditing, corporate accounting, governmental, not-for-profit organizations, and taxation.

  6. Demonstrate the capability to critically and reflectively engage ethical issues in accounting, particularly questions pertaining to social responsibility and professional practice.

Program Director

George Grzesiowski



What can I do with this major?

Program Requirements


B.S. in Accounting (120 hours)

The following courses are required for a baccalaureate degree:

  • 38 hours: General Education

  • 24 hours: Requisites for the Major (common body of knowledge)
    ACCT 210 Principles of Accounting I
    ACCT 211 Principles of Accounting II
    ACCT 225 Accounting Information Systems
    ECON 210 Macroeconomics
    BSMT 120 Management Thought, Principles and Practice or BSMT 380 Organizational Leadership
    MATH 104 Algebra and Trigonometry
    MATH 171 Statistics or PSY 230 Statistics for Behavioral Science
    BSMT 375 Business and Professional Ethics

  • 39 hours: Upper Level Courses in Major
    ACCT 300 Intermediate Accounting I
    ACCT 301 Intermediate Accounting II
    ACCT 320 Advanced Accounting
    ACCT 330 Cost Accounting
    ACCT 475 Fraud Examination
    BSMT 330 Law and the Manager I
    BSMT 331 Law and the Manager II
    ACCT 415 Government and Non-profit Accounting
    ACCT 450 Income Tax Accounting I
    ACCT 451 Income Tax Accounting II
    ACCT 470 Auditing
    ACCT 499 Senior Seminar in Accounting
    BSMT 350 Business Communications

  • 19 hours: Electives
    The student is encouraged to build a minor in a complementary field.

The Forensic Accounting major is designed to provide students with the knowledge necessary to investigate financial and “white collar” criminal activities. Course selection and design ensure that graduates acquire a thorough and systematic knowledge of agencies and institutions in the public and private sector, have a firm perception of law and its role in the delivery of American justice, and are aware of the social, psychological, and political aspects of crime and punishment.

Forensic accountants work in most major accounting firms and are needed to investigate mergers and acquisitions, tax investigations, economic crime investigations, all kinds of civil litigation support, specialized audits, and even terrorist investigations.

Forensic Accountants work throughout the business world, in public accounting, corporations, and in all of units of government, from the FBI and CIA to the offices of local authorities.


B.S. in Accounting with a Forensic Accounting Concentration (120 hours)

The following courses are required for a baccalaureate degree:

  • 38 hours: General Education

  • 39 hours: Required Courses in Accounting
    ACCT 210 Principles of Accounting I
    ACCT 211 Principles of Accounting II
    ACCT 225 Accounting Information Systems
    ACCT 300 Intermediate Accounting I
    ACCT 301 Intermediate Accounting II
    BSMT 330 Law and the Manager I
    BSMT 331 Law and the Manager II
    ACCT 330 Cost Accounting
    ACCT 450 Income Tax Accounting I
    ACCT 451 Income Tax Accounting II
    ACCT 470 Auditing
    ACCT 475 Fraud Examination
    ACCT 499 Senior Seminar

  • 24 hours: Required Courses in Criminal Justice
    CRIJ 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice
    CRIJ 300 Criminology
    CRIJ 310 Criminal Law
    CRIJ 311 Criminal Procedures
    CRIJ 320 Laws of Evidence
    CRIJ 330 Scientific Criminal Investigation
    CRIJ 435 White Collar Crime
    CRIJ 497 Research in Criminal Justice

  • 19 hours: Electives
    Courses suggested:
    BSMT 120 Management Thought, Principle and Practice (or, BSMT 380)
    BSMT 350 Business Communications
    BSMT 375 Business and Professional Ethics
    ECON 210 Macroeconomics

A.S. in Accounting (59 hours)

The following courses are required for the Associates degree:

  • 35 hours: General Education

  • 15 hours: Requisites for the Major
    ACCT 210 Principles of Accounting I
    ACCT 211 Principles of Accounting II
    ACCT 225 Accounting Information Systems
    BSMT 120 Management Thought, Principles and Practice
    ECON 210 Principles of Economics I

  • 9 hours: Upper Level Courses in Major
    ACCT 300 Intermediate Accounting I
    ACCT 301 Intermediate Accounting II
    ACCT 330 Cost Accounting

Minor in Accounting (15 hours)

The following courses are required:
ACCT 210 Principles of Accounting I
ACCT 211 Principles of Accounting II
ACCT 225 Accounting Information Systems

Choice of the following tracks, depending on interest (other combinations possible; see Program Director).
ACCT 300 and 301 Intermediate 1 & 2 (financial track)
ACCT 450 and 451 Income Tax 1 & 2 (taxation)
ACCT 300 and 475 Cost Accounting & Fraud Examination
ACCT 415 and 475 Government & Non-Profit Accounting & Fraud Examination

Second Degree in Accounting (42 hours)

The following courses are required:
ACCT 210 Principles of Accounting I
ACCT 211 Principles of Accounting II
ACCT 225 Accounting Information Systems
ACCT 300 Intermediate Accounting I
ACCT 301 Intermediate Accounting II
ACCT 320 Advanced Accounting
ACCT 330 Cost Accounting
ACCT 475 Forensic Accounting
ACCT 415 Government and Non-Profit Accounting
ACCT 450 Income Tax Accounting I
ACCT 451 Income Tax Accounting II
ACCT 470 Auditing
BSMT 330 Law and the Manager I BSMT 331 Law and the Manager II

Requirements for the CPA Examination

The State of Indiana requires all students wishing to sit for the CPA examination to have obtained a bachelor degree and have completed 150 hours of college credit. Students who plan to take the CPA Examination outside the State of Indiana should see the Accounting Program Director for the particular requirements of the state in which they plan to sit.

Eligibility for Examination

To apply for the Uniform CPA Examination in Indiana, you must meet ONE of the following requirements:

  1. Earned 150 semester hours in general education which must include a graduate degree from a college or university that is accredited by an accrediting organization recognized by the Board, and completed:

    • At least 24 semester hours in accounting at the undergraduate level or 15 semester hours in accounting at the graduate level or an equivalent combination thereof which must include courses covering the following subjects:
      • Financial accounting,
      • Auditing,
      • Taxation,
      • Managerial accounting; and
    • At least 24 semester hours in business administration and economics courses, other than accounting courses, at the undergraduate or graduate level, which may include:
      • Up to six semester hours of business and tax law courses
      • Up to six semester hours of computer science courses
  2. Earned 150 semester hours in general education which must include a baccalaureate degree from a college or university that is accredited by an accrediting organization recognized by the Board; and completed:

    • At least 24 semester hours in accounting at the undergraduate or graduate level which must include courses covering the following subjects:
      • Financial accounting,
      • Auditing,
      • Taxation,
      • Managerial accounting; and
    • At least 24 semester hours in business administration and economics courses, other than accounting courses, which may include:
      • Up to six semester hours of business and tax law courses
      • Up to six semester hours of computer science courses

All educational transcript(s), Certificates of Enrollment, and/or international evaluation reports are required to be submitted at the time of application to CPA Examination Services directly from the academic institution(s).

ACCT 210 Principles of Accounting I
3 hours
This course prepares the accounting student in the theory and techniques of accounting necessary for the advanced courses and provides a basic introduction to accounting for those students pursuing an accounting degree. Students will be introduced to financial statements and the accounting cycle for a service and merchandise business.

ACCT 211 Principles of Accounting II
3 hours
This course is a continuation of ACC 210. Students are introduced to the accounting requirements of the partnership and corporate form of business. Topics also include financial statement analysis and the preparation of a cash flow statement.
Prerequisite: ACCT 210

ACCT 215 Personal Finance
3 hours
This course examines the process of setting and achieving financial goals. Emphasis is placed on personal financial planning, managing investments, and protecting you with insurance, retirement, estate planning, and planned borrowing.

ACCT 225 Accounting Information Systems
3 hours
This course emphasizes computerized accounting information systems, transaction cycles, systems development, and internal control. Course includes the use of business software such as QuickBooks. By mastering the skills emphasized in this class, the student will be better prepared to enter the accounting workplace.
Prerequisites: ACCT 210

ACCT 300 Intermediate Accounting I
3 hours
Globalization is occurring rapidly. As economic and other interactions increase among countries, capital markets must provide high-quality financial information. A need therefore exists for highquality financial reporting standards that meet this objective. Fortunately, International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) has broad international acceptance, being used in some form by more than 115 countries around the world. This course provides the tools needed to understand what IFRS is and how it is applied in practice. The emphasis on fair value, the proper accounting for financial instruments, and the new developments related to leasing, revenue recognition, and financial statement presentation are examined in light of current practice. In addition, given the rapid changes taking place, we provide and discuss the new Conceptual Framework to understand how these issues will likely be resolved in the future.
Prerequisites: ACCT 210-211

ACCT 301 Intermediate Accounting II
3 hours
This course is a continuation of Intermediate Accounting I. International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) are covered. The course provides the tool needed to understand international standards and how they are applied in practice.
Prerequisite: ACCT 300

ACCT 320 Advanced Accounting
3 hours
This course presents an in-depth analysis of advanced accounting topics. Students are introduced to partnerships, the consolidation of financial statements, combinations, the reporting requirements of business segments, branches, estates and trusts. International aspects of accounting are also covered.
Prerequisites: ACCT 210-211

ACCT 330 Cost Accounting
3 hours
This course consists of a discussion of cost accounting concepts and objectives, an in-depth study of cost accounting systems and accumulation procedures, and a search into the elements of material, labor and factory overhead costs.
Prerequisites: ACCT 210-211; MATH 103 or MATH 160 or concurrent registration.

ACCT 332 Law and The Manager I
3 hours
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the role of law in society and specifically in business. Areas of study include contracts, personal property, bailment and sales.
Cross-listed: BSMT 330, PAR 331

ACCT 333 Law and The Manager II
3 hours
This course is designed to acquaint the student with law in the areas of commercial paper, debtors’ and creditors’ rights, agency, legal forms of organization, real property and estates.
Cross-listed: BSMT 331, PAR 332

ACCT 415 Government and Nonprofit Accounting
3 hours
This course will acquaint the student with accounting theory and principles for non-profit entities, governmental entities, schools and hospitals. The course examines the differences between for-profit and not-for-profit accounting concepts.
Prerequisite: ACCT 210-211

ACCT 450 Income Tax Accounting I
3 hours
These courses are designed to familiarize the student with the federal income tax laws through lectures and practical problems. They are devoted to an intensive study of the income tax laws as they apply to individuals, partnerships, and corporations.
Prerequisites: ACCT 210, 211

ACCT 451 Income Tax Accounting II
3 hours
This course is a continuation of ACC 450. The course familiarizes the student with federal income tax laws as they apply to corporations and partnerships.
Prerequisite: ACCT 450

ACCT 470 Auditing
3 hours
This course is a study of the standards, principles, practices and procedures of auditing. Students are required to integrate and apply prior accounting coursework.
Prerequisites: ACCT 210-211, 300-301

ACCT 475 Fraud Examination
3 hours
This course reviews strategies and tactics essential to the fraud examination process. Students should have a basic knowledge of accounting. The course guides the student into specialized applied settings, indicative of forensic accounting. Coverage includes: financial statement analysis, interpretation and scrutiny of financial records and documentation, trace techniques, reporting irregularities, fraud examination approaches, legal rules and statutory construction pertinent to accounting practices. Common fraud cases are reviewed such as bankruptcy, insurance, employee/employer reporting, covert examinations, trading practices, and money laundering schemes.
Prerequisites: ACCT 210-211

ACCT 496 Topics in Accounting
1-3 hours
This course will examine topics of special interest in the Accounting field. Topics courses (but not specific courses) may be repeated for a total of 6 hours.

ACCT 499 Senior Seminar in Accounting
3 hours
This capstone course is designed to assist students in integration and critical examination of the various concepts, theories, and procedures learned in accounting. Students will complete the accounting cycle using a business simulation. Even though most businesses now use computerized accounting systems rather than manual ones, the process followed in both systems are similar. The advantage of learning by using a manual system is the greater depth of understanding gained by going through each step in the documentation and recording system. Although computers perform some of these steps internally, accountants must understand the procedures. Through manual preparation you are able to observe the paths of information flow that are unobservable in computerized systems.
Prerequisite: Senior standing is required.



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