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General Education

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A General Education is the foundation of a liberal arts education. The General Education sequence at CCSJ will prepare students for success in their chosen major by providing a foundation of skills, knowledge, and values that reflect our mission.

All students, regardless of their major, must complete the General Education sequence.


Mission Statement

Calumet College of St. Joseph is a Catholic institution of higher learning dedicated to the academic, spiritual and ethical development of undergraduate and graduate students. Informed by the values of its founding religious community, the Missionaries of the Precious Blood (C.PP.S.), the College promotes the inherent dignity of all people, social justice, an ethic of service, student empowerment, opportunity, and lifelong learning.

Objectives & Goals

General Education Goals


  1. Students will read analytically, synthetically, and critically in a variety of genres.
  2. Students will write in a variety of forms using valid logic, persuasive rhetoric, and correct grammar, usage, and punctuation.
  3. Students will be able to orally deliver a presentation with a clear central idea that is logically developed, supported by convincing evidence and valid reasoning, and expressed using language and delivery choices thoughtfully adapted to the audience.
  4. Students can represent, apply, analyze, and evaluate relevant qualitative and quantitative mathematical and scientific evidence (i.e. equations, graphs, diagrams, tables, words) to support or refute an argument.
  5. Students will appreciate, create, and critique the persuasive power of art and media.
  6. The student will be able to apply ethical standards to social issues and analyze their own core beliefs and the origin of these beliefs.

General Education Objectives


Reading

  • The student will develop a college-level vocabulary, note taking skills, and active reading strategies.
  • The student knows a variety of genres and their conventions and understands the text in relation to particular contexts.
  • The student identifies the thesis, main ideas, and supporting evidence of a text.
  • The student comprehends textual organization and structure, outlining and articulating parts and wholes.
  • The student interprets the text using a variety of disciplinary strategies and conventions.
  • The student evaluates the ideas presented in the text within historical, disciplinary, or other contexts.
  • The student engages in intelligent conversation about the text in classroom and disciplinary settings.
  • The student reads synoptically a set of texts in relationship to one another.
  • The student recognizes implications of a text for larger social issues.

Writing

  • The student exercises control over the writing process, including prewriting, revision, and editing.
  • The student responds directly to a variety of prompts, assignments, and writing tasks.
  • The student writes in accordance with various generic and rhetorical conventions.
  • The student formulates a clear, central purpose or thesis.
  • The student organizes his or her ideas in a logical sequence appropriate to the discipline.
  • The student supports main ideas with convincing evidence and valid reasoning.
  • The student effectively and responsibly blends source material into his or her own writing, refuting and incorporating opposing viewpoints.
  • The student produces clear, concise, and coherent sentences and paragraphs.
  • The student composes grammatically correct sentences in a variety of types.
  • The student adheres to standard rules of spelling, punctuation, and usage.

Oral Communication

  • The student will conceive and articulate a clear central idea.
  • The student will support main ideas with convincing evidence and valid reasoning.
  • The student will organize his or her presentation in a logical sequence appropriate to the discipline.
  • The student will, when appropriate, qualify the central idea by refuting or incorporating opposing evidence and viewpoints.
  • The student will express their ideas using language thoughtfully adapted to the audience.
  • The student will appear comfortable and employ effective delivery techniques to make the presentation clear and engaging.

Quantitative Reasoning and Scientific Inquiry

  • The student can perform correct, clear and concise calculations.
  • The student can interpret and explain information that is presented in mathematical forms (e.g. equations, graphs, diagrams, tables, words).
  • The student can analyze and apply quantitative and scientific data to make judgements and draw appropriate conclusions.
  • The student can identify assumptions in scientific inquiry (e.g. estimation, modeling, and data analysis) and evaluate the validity of inferences drawn from the data.
  • The student can express quantitative or scientific evidence in support of an argument or the purpose of work (with respect to what evidence is used and how it is formatted, presented, and contextualized).
  • The student can apply mathematical and scientific evidence to the understanding and evaluation of real world ethical, spiritual, and intellectual issues.

Art and Media

  • Students will understand the basic principles of design (balance, contrast, unity, values, and color, etc.).
  • Students will understand the distinctive features and power of the arts.
  • Students will interpret works of art and media.
  • Students will create art in a variety of media, understanding its role in self-expression and communication.

Ethical Reasoning

  • The student will identify ethical standards that emerge from the Catholic tradition, the humanities, the social sciences, and the sciences.
  • The student will synthesize a position on a complex, multilayered issue that involves differing perspectives, using ethical ideals from the Catholic tradition and different disciplines.
  • The student will analyze the assumptions an implications of the position.
  • The student will respond to objections and alternative views.
  • The student will thoughtfully analyze their own core beliefs.

Curriculum

The College’s General Education requirement includes 38 credit hours of course work, which includes a 1-credit-hour Orientation, a 3-credit-hour course in Social Justice and a Theological general education capstone.

Students who started at Calumet College of St. Joseph in Fall 2017 or later, either as new or transferring students, are subject to these requirements. Students admitted prior to Fall 2017 should consult the catalog under which they were accepted to identify the applicable General Education Requirements.

General Education Courses


The College’s General Education baccalaureate degree course requirements are as follows:

Required courses during freshman semesters 1 and 2:

  • General Education 100 or 100T (transfer protected)
  • General Education 290 (Honors students only)
  • HUMS 110 Foundations of Western Culture (transfer protected)
  • EWPC 103 English Composition (Honors students take EWPC 106)
  • THEO 110 Social Justice (transfer protected)
  • EWPC 150 Public Speaking
  • MATH 104 Algebra and Trigonometry, or MATH 110 Finite Mathematics, or MATH 171 Principles of Statistics
  • BIOL 115 Cell and Evolution Biology plus lab, or CHEM 200 General and Analytical Chemistry I plus lab, or GEOL 110 Earth and Space Science plus lab, or SCIE 102 General Science plus lab

Any two of the following Humanities courses during the second semester of freshman year and/or the sophomore year (students are not able to repeat a prefix in their Humanities choices):

  • ARTS 100 Introduction to the Performing Arts
  • ARTS 120 Digital Photography
  • ARTS 140 Introduction to Graphic Design
  • ARTS 160 Drawing I
  • ARTS 170 Introduction to Visual Arts
  • EWPC 111 The Literary Experience (Honors students take EWPC 112)
  • PHIL 200 Great Philosophical Ideas

Any two of the following Social Science courses during the second semester of freshman year and/or the sophomore year (students are not able to repeat a prefix in their Social Science choices):

  • ECON 160 Economic Theory and Personal Finance
  • HIST 110 American Civilization
  • HIST 115 Western Civilization
  • HIST 120 World Civilizations
  • PLSC 220 American Political System I
  • PSY 100 Introduction to Psychology
  • SOCL 210 General Sociology

A Capstone Sequence taken in order beginning in the second semester of sophomore year or later:

  • EWPC 204 Academic Reading and Writing II (transfer protected)
  • THEO 230 The Search for Ultimate Meaning (transfer protected)

Some courses in the General Education curriculum can be taken to meet the needs of students majoring in any of the College’s traditional academic programs.

The General Education Program applies to students in traditional, associate degree, and accelerated degree programs, as well as to transfer students. To this end,

  • Traditional students complete the 38-credit-hour General Education Program.
  • Associate degree students complete the first 36-credit hours of General Education, plus 24 credit hours in their major discipline, for a 60-credit-hour program.
  • Transfer students meet the 38-credit-hour General Education Program requirements, including taking the transfer-protected courses, HUMS 110, THEO 110, EWPC 204, and THEO 230.
  • Students in accelerated programs meet the 38-credit-hour General Education Program requirements through a special sequence, described below.

Full-time Traditional Students with few or No College Credits

Prior to their first semester, new traditional students take GENL 100, Orientation. In their first semester, these students take three or four General Education classes, two of which, HUMS 110, Foundations of Western Culture and THEO 110, Social Justice, are linked in a common learning community. Freshmen typically take a math General Education requirement: MATH 104 Algebra and Trigonometry, or MATH 110 Finite Mathematics, or MATH 171 Principles of Statistics. They also take a course in their major their first semester.

In their second semester, traditional students take additional General Education requirements: EWPC 150 (Public Speaking), the math requirement if not taken first semester, and the science requirement: BIOL 115 (Cell and Evolution Biology plus lab) or CHEM 200 (General and Analytical Chemistry I plus lab) or GEOL 110 (Earth and Space Science plus lab) or SCIE 102 (General Science plus lab). In addition, they take a course in their major and a General Education elective.

Signature assignments occur in MATH 104, MATH 110, MATH 171, EWPC 103, EWPC 150, EWPC 204, and THEO 230. Students will complete Signature Assignments in MATH 104, MATH 110, MATH 171, EWPC 103 and EWPC 150 to demonstrate competence in foundational skills, and they complete Signature Assignments in EWPC 204 and THEO 230 to demonstrate that they have achieved General Education objectives.

General Education Course Requirements for Accelerated Programs

Students pursuing accelerated degrees enter these programs with at least 52 credit hours and will meet the 38-credit-hour General Education requirements as the table below indicates.

Transfer Students

Transfer students must meet the 38-credit-hour General Education Program requirements, including taking the transfer-protected courses, HUMS 110, THEO 110, EWPC 204, and THEO 230. Students will complete Signature Assignments in EWPC 204 and THEO 230 to demonstrate that they have achieved the General Education objectives.

Gen Ed ORMN PSM
GENL 100 Waived Waived
HUMS 110 Equivalent course w/in the program, ORMN 435, Liberal Studies I Equivalent course w/in the program, PSM 309, Multicultural and Diverse Populations
EWPC 103 or equivalent Same Same
THEO 110 Equivalent course w/in program, ORMN 455, Business Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Management Equivalent course w/in program, PSM 425, Ethics in Public Safety
EWPC 150 or equivalent Same Same
MATH 104, 110, or 171 or equivalent Same Same
BIO, CHEM, GEOL, or SCIE or equivalent Same Same
Humanities choice 1 Same Same
Humanities choice 2 Equivalent course w/in program, ORMN 450, Liberal Studies II Equivalent course w/in program, PSM 435, Contemporary Issues in Public Safety
Social Studies choice 1: PSYC, HIST, SOC, ECON, PLSC Same Same
Social Studies choice 2: PSYC, HIST, SOC, ECON, PLSC Same Same
EWPC 204 Equivalent course w/in the program, ORMN 421, Research and Writing Equivalent course w/in the program, PSM 325, Introduction to Research of Public Safety Issues
Capstone: THEO 230 Capstone synthesis: ORMN 463: Integrative Project Capstone synthesis: Strategy & Policy in PSM


Assessment

Signature Assignments

Signature assignments occur in MATH 104, MATH 110, MATH 171, EWPC 103, EWPC 150, EWPC 204, and THEO 230. Students will complete Signature Assignments in MATH 104, MATH 110, MATH 171, EWPC 103 and EWPC 150 to demonstrate competence in foundational skills, and they complete Signature Assignments in EWPC 204 and THEO 230 to demonstrate that they have achieved General Education objectives.

Students will prepare for Signature Assignments via the introduction, reinforcement and mastery of general education objectives in the following general education courses:


General Education Goals

  1. Students will read analytically, synthetically, and critically in a variety of genres.

    Introduced Reinforced Mastered
    Skills and Signiture Courses HUMS 110, EWPC 103, THEO 110, BIOL 115, CHEM 200, GEOL 110, SCIE 102    
    Humanities Choices   EWPC 111, ARTS 100, 120, 140, 160, 170, PHIL 200  
    Social Science Choices   PSYC 100, HIST 110, 115, 120, SOC 210, ECON 160, PLSC 220  
    Capstone Sequence     EWPC 204, THEO 230

  2. Students will write in a variety of forms using valid logic, persuasive rhetoric, and correct grammar, usage, and punctuation.

    Introduced Reinforced Mastered
    Skills and Signiture Courses HUMS 110, EWPC 103, THEO 110, BIOL 115, CHEM 200, GEOL 110, SCIE 102    
    Humanities Choices   EWPC 111, ARTS 100, 120, 140, 160, 170, PHIL 200  
    Social Science Choices   PSYC 100, HIST 110, 115, 120, SOC 210, ECON 160, PLSC 220  
    Capstone Sequence     EWPC 204, THEO 230

  3. Students will be able to orally deliver a presentation with a clear central idea that is logically developed, supported by convincing evidence and valid reasoning, and expressed using language and delivery choices thoughtfully adapted to the audience.

    Introduced Reinforced Mastered
    Skills and Signiture Courses HUMS 110, THEO 110, EWPC 150 EWPC 150  
    Humanities Choices   EWPC 111, ARTS 100, 120, 140, 160, 170, PHIL 200  
    Social Science Choices   PSYC 100, HIST 110, 115, 120, SOC 210, ECON 160, PLSC 220  
    Capstone Sequence   EWPC 204 THEO 230

  4. Students can represent, apply, analyze, and evaluate relevant qualitative and quantitative mathematical and scientific evidence (i.e. equations, graphs, diagrams, tables, words) to support or refute an argument.

    Introduced Reinforced Mastered
    Skills and Signiture Courses MATH 104, 110, 171, BIOL 115, CHEM 200, GEOL 110, SCIE 102 MATH 104, 110, 171, BIOL 115, CHEM 200, GEOL 110, SCIE 102  
    Humanities Choices      
    Social Science Choices   PSYC 100, HIST 110, 115, 120, SOC 210, ECON 160, PLSC 220  
    Capstone Sequence   EWPC 204  

  5. Students will appreciate, create, and critique the persuasive power of art and media.

    Introduced Reinforced Mastered
    Skills and Signiture Courses HUMS 110, EWPC 103, THEO 110, EWPC 150 HUMS 110  
    Humanities Choices   EWPC 111, ARTS 100, 120, 140, 160, 170, PHIL 200 ARTS 100, 120, 140, 160, 170
    Social Science Choices      
    Capstone Sequence     EWPC 204, THEO 230

  6. The student will be able to apply ethical standards to social issues and analyze their own core beliefs and the origin of these beliefs.

    Introduced Reinforced Mastered
    Skills and Signiture Courses HUMS 110, EWPC 103, THEO 110, BIOL 115, CHEM 200, GEOL 110, SCIE 102    
    Humanities Choices   EWPC 111, ARTS 100, 120, 140, 160, 170, PHIL 200  
    Social Science Choices   PSYC 100, HIST 110, 115, 120, SOC 210, ECON 160, PLSC 220  
    Capstone Sequence   EWPC 204 THEO 230

What does it mean to attend a Liberal Arts College
in the Catholic Tradition?


Attending a liberal arts college means that we are focused on our students! Everything that we do revolves around our students and their experiences.
YOU BELONG!

Attending a liberal arts college means that we are a community that celebrates individualism and relationships among students, faculty, staff, and community partners.
YOU BELONG!

Attending a liberal arts college means that we are focused on supporting student activities that provide opportunities for student leadership, interest exploration, and activities outside of the classroom that make attending CCSJ holistically fulfilling.
YOU BELONG!

Attending a liberal arts college means that our students have access to their professors, particularly in their general education courses. Course sections are small enough that each student has a voice in the classroom and faculty have quality time with their students in order to get to know them, evaluate and critique their work, and serve as mentors.
YOU BELONG!

Attending a liberal arts college means that students will be in a learning environment where their thoughts and ideas are heard, where they will be exposed to different perspectives, and where they will become critical thinkers.
YOU BELONG!

Attending a liberal arts college means that students take classes in many disciplines. Liberal arts colleges provide students with the opportunity to learn about humanities, the arts, natural sciences, mathematics, and social sciences. A liberal arts education prepares students for a variety of career paths.
YOU BELONG!

Attending a liberal arts college means that we prepare students for graduate school through our focus on critical thinking, undergraduate research opportunities and class participation.
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Attending a liberal arts college means that we prepare students to be successful in the workforce. Students will be equipped with communication (both written and verbal), analytical, and teamwork skills that employers demand from their employees.
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