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The Human Services Program offers an A.S. Degree in Human Services and a B.S. in Human Services with two concentrations: Social Services and Counseling. With the approval of the Program Director, Counseling Concentrators may also design a clinical counseling specialization that more closely fits their professional interests or use the credit hours to complete a minor in another discipline.

Department Chairperson: Valerie Pennanen, Ph.D.

Program Director: Elizabeth Guzman-Arredondo, M.S.W., L.S.W.

Faculty: Denis Adams, M.S.W.; Marilyn Bogash, M.H.S.; Vernita Brokemond, M.S.W.; Elizabeth Guzman-Arredondo, M.S.W., L.S.W.; LaConyea Pitts Thomas, M.S.W., L.C.S.W.; Ebony Williams, M.S. W.; Dr. Eileen Stenzel (Professor Emerita)

  • Mission Statement
  • Vision Statement
  • Objectives
  • Program Details
  • Program Director

The Human Services Program prepares students to offer social and clinical interventions that will help individuals and groups achieve their highest level of functioning; exhibit sensitivity to the cultural and ethnic roots of human behavior; and consistently demonstrate a commitment to maintaining good mental health. All Human Services faculty offer personal and academic support to students as they work toward assuming the responsibilities of public services within a framework of a commitment to social justice.

The Human Services Program strives to increase the number of graduate-level human service providers in Northwest Indiana with particular attention to increasing the representation of minorities within the helping professions.

Upon completion of the Human Services Program, students will demonstrate mastery of the knowledge, skills and attitudes that characterize the Human Service Professional.

  • Origins and Theoretical Orientations of the Helping Professions: All students will be able to explain the origins of the human service profession, the value base of the profession and discuss issues that will impact its growth.
  • Theories and Techniques of Human Service Social and Clinical Interventions: All students will be able to identify and critically evaluate the major theories and techniques of social and clinical intervention and their relevance to the helping profession.
  • Systems Theory: All students will be able to apply a range of theories to explain human systems: families, small groups, organizations and social systems.
  • Social and Developmental Theory: All students will be able to apply medical, social and Psychological models of human behavior to identify the conditions that promote and impede attainment of optimal human functioning.
  • Basic Communication and Technology Literacy: All students will demonstrate competencies in literacy and technical writing, methods of research and measurement, and computer literacy.
  • Knowledge of and Respect for Cultural Diversity: All students will demonstrate cultural sensitivity and multi-cultural awareness.
  • The Twelve Core Functions of a Counselor/The Eight Counseling Skill Groups: Counseling students will demonstrate proficiency in the Twelve Core Functions of a Counselor and the Eight Counseling Skills Groups.
  • Community Organizing and Public Policy Development: Social Service students will demonstrate proficiency in the skills of community organization, the development of social policy and human service issues that are unique to urban environments.
  • Treatment Planning: All students will demonstrate proficiency in the strategies for planning and implementing social and clinical interventions.
  • Personal Growth and Commitment to Good Mental Health: All students will demonstrate a high level of personal self-awareness, an enhanced understanding of the mechanisms of social communication, increased awareness of inevitable sources of interpersonal conflict, and become more goal-oriented and strategic in their interactive behavior.
  • Working with Special Populations: Through completion of the various concentrations and specialties offered in the program students will demonstrate effective intervention skills with special populations: the bereaved, the chemically dependent, children, etc.
  • Critical Thinking and Analytical Skills: All students will demonstrate the full range of competencies in critical thinking and higher order analysis necessary for the Human Services profession.
  • Professional Identity and Commitment to Life-Long Learning: Students will be able to articulate their identity as human service professionals and formulate a plan for on-going professional development.
  • Ethical Competence: Students will be familiar with the Codes of Ethics of the major professional organizations that regulate the helping professions and demonstrate consistent growth in their ability to comply with these standards.

Programmatic Admission/Retention Requirements

All students must meet the requirements for admission to the College.

The Human Services Program retains the right to recommend that students withdraw from the Human Services Program if they fail to demonstrate consistent progress toward the attainment of program objectives. In order to continue in the program, students must earn a letter grade of a C for all major courses and maintain a 2.5 GPA. Students who fall below this standard must follow the normal procedures for repetition of coursework. Students may not have violated any of the commonly accepted ethical or moral standards of Human Service professions. Students will receive written guidelines of all program requirements as part of the Introduction to Human Services course or in the course of their Application Interview.

It is expected that Human Services students will demonstrate consistent progress toward the completion of the degree. The Human Services faculty is committed to making every effort to assist students in the attainment of this goal.

Human Services students are expected to demonstrate the standards of professional behavior commonly found in the various Codes of Professional Ethics. This includes a commitment to developing and maintaining the personal growth and development needed to function effectively in the helping professions, as well as academic honesty and integrity. Students who demonstrate serious levels of personal impairment will be asked to consult with the Program Director. Every effort will be made to provide students with the support they need to meet this standard of personal fitness for the profession. Students who are unable to meet these ethical standards will not be allowed to continue in the Human Services Program.

Assessment of Students' Mastery of Educational Objectives

The assessment process of the Human Services Program consists of course based, and program based assessment. Student performance across courses is assessed each semester. Students complete an assessment project as part of the Practicum.

Program Delivery

In order to assist students with the time and space barriers frequently encountered by working adults, the Human Services Program offers the curriculum in an accelerated delivery system that includes both hybrid (a combination of on-campus and distance delivery) and on-line courses. The hybrid courses meet two hours a week for fourteen weeks. One course meets from 5:30 – 7:30 pm. It is linked with a second course scheduled from 7:45-9:45pm. These courses are supplemented with Blackboard. A student can use this system to complete two courses coming to campus one night per week or four courses coming two nights per week. The second accelerated delivery format is on-line courses.

Elizabeth Guzman-Arredondo
Elizabeth Guzman-Arredondo





What can I do with this major?



Program Requirements


  • B.S. Social Service
  • B.S. Counseling
  • A.S.
  • Minor
  • Courses

B.S. in Human Services with a Social Services Concentration (120 hours)

The following courses are required for a baccalaureate degree:

  • 38 hours: General Education

  • 15 hours: Requisites for the Major
    HSV 100 Introduction to Human Services
    HSV 220 Human Services Models & Methods
    HSV 230 Pharmacology of Human Services
    HSV 250 Human Service and Professional Issues
    PSY 230 Statistics for Behavioral Sciences

  • 42 hours: Upper Level Courses in Major
    HSV 300 Family Dynamics
    HSV 312 Death Dying and Caregiving
    HSV 319 Case Management
    HSV 350 Theological Skills for Human Service Professionals
    HSV 358 Social Service and Public Policy
    HSV 400 Crisis Intervention
    HSV 405 Counseling Diverse Populations
    HSV 413 Methods in Community Organizations
    HSV 420 Group Counseling
    HSV 430 Assessment and Treatment Planning
    HSV 495 Practicum
    HSV 496 Topics in Human Services
    HSV 497 Research in Human Services
    An HSV elective at the 300 level or higher

  • 25 hours: Electives

B.S. in Human Services with a Counseling Concentration (120 hours)

The following courses are required for a baccalaureate degree:

  • 38 hours: General Education

  • 15 hours: Requisites for the Major
    HSV 100 Introduction to Human Services
    HSV 220 Human Services Models and Methods
    HSV 230 Pharmacology of Human Services
    HSV 250 Human Services and Professional Issues
    PSY 230 Statistics for Behavioral Science

  • 45 hours: Upper Level Courses in Major
    HSV 300 Family Dynamics
    HSV 305 Theoretical Bases of Counseling
    HSV 310 Clinical Counseling Practice
    HSV 319 Case Management
    HSV 328 Counseling the Chemically Dependent
    HSV 342 Counseling for Sexual and Domestic Violence
    HSV 350 Theological Skills for Human Service Professionals
    HSV 400 Crisis Intervention (taken as part of the A.S. Degree)
    HSV 405 Counseling Diverse Populations
    HSV 420 Group Dynamics
    HSV 430 Assessment and Treatment Planning
    HSV 495 Practicum
    HSV 496 Topics in Human Services
    HSV 497 Research in Human Services
    An HSV elective at the 300 level or higher

  • 22 hours: Electives

A.S. in Human Services (62 hours)

The following courses are required for the Associate’s degree:

  • 35 hours: General Education

  • 12 hours: Requisites for the Major
    HSV 100 Introduction to Human Services
    HSV 220 Human Services Models and Methods
    HSV 230 Pharmacology of Human Services
    HSV 250 Human Services & Professional Issues

  • 15 hours: Upper Level Courses in Major
    HSV 319 Case Management
    HSV 400 Crisis Intervention
    HSV 420 Group Dynamics
    HSV 496 Topics in Human Services
    HSV ___ Human Services Elective

One or more prerequisites can be waived by the Program Director if a student transfers courses that can be accepted as a substitution.

Minor in Human Services (18 hours)

The following courses are required:

  • 6 hours: Requisites for the Major
    HSV 100 Introduction to Human Services
    HSV 220 Human Services Models and Methods

  • 12 hours: Human Services Electives
    HSV _____
    HSV _____
    HSV _____
    HSV _____

HSV 100. Introduction to Human Services
3 hours
Students will be provided with an overview of the Human Services field and the various concentrations offered at Calumet College of St. Joseph. This course serves as the foundational course for the Counseling and Social Service concentrations.
Delivered as an accelerated hybrid course linked with HSV 220.

HSV 220. Human Services Models and Methods
3 hours
The student will be given an overview of the various treatment modalities used in the direct practice of social service delivery in both a social service and clinical context. These skills will focus on the management of the change process.
Prerequisite: Introduction to Human Services (HSV 100) or taken concurrently.
Delivered as an accelerated hybrid course linked with HSV 100.

HSV 230. Pharmacology of Human Services
3 hours
This course focuses upon the nature of psychoactive drugs, the effects they have on the body and mind of the user and the behaviors associated with their use and abuse. Drug interactions and withdrawal symptoms will be identified for each class of drugs. The relationship with pharmacology and the addictions counseling field will be emphasized.
Prerequisite: Introduction to Human Services (HSV 100)

HSV 235. Statistics and Research Methods for Human Services
3 hours
This course will introduce students to descriptive and inferential statistics and a broad range of research methods essential for the professional human services provider. Topics covered: descriptive statistics, introduction to probability, normal and binomial distributions, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, regression and correlation. Students will be introduced to the following research methods: participant observation, survey design, interviewing skills, Internet and journal research, and empirical research design.

HSV 250. Human Service and Professional Issues
3 hours
This course surveys the standards of professional conduct and ethical codes for various associations and/or credentialing organizations. Organizations to be considered are the Indiana Counselors Association on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse, National Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse counselors, American Psychological Association, American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, National Association of Social Workers, and the Health Professions Bureau (Indiana). The goal of this course is to provide the student with the necessary information to enable students to make informed decisions regarding appropriate behavior with clients and other professionals.
Delivered as a hybrid course with scheduled support seminars.

HSV 300. Family Dynamics
3 hours
This course will explore the systems approach to family treatment using several theories of family therapy. Focus will be on the recognition of the rules, roles, and communication styles and coping mechanisms within different family systems. The use of various techniques including the genogram, sculpturing, and paradoxical interventions will also be studied.
Prerequisites: Introduction to Human Service (HSV 100); Theoretical Base of Counseling (HSV 305).
Delivered as an online course.

HSV 305. Theoretical Bases of Counseling
3 hours
This course surveys theoretical foundations of major contemporary approaches to counseling and psychotherapy. Students will learn the theory of personality and understanding of how to affect change characteristic of nine theories of personality and counseling. Students will be encouraged to begin the process of developing a personal style of counseling.
Prerequisites: Introduction to Human Service (HSV 100); Models and Methods (HSV 220).
Delivered as an accelerated, hybrid course linked with HSV 310.

HSV 310. Clinical Counseling Practice
3 hours
This course introduces students to a short-term, problem solving model of counseling, instruction in each of the Twelve Core Functions of the counselor and an overview of the Eight Counselor Skill Groups.
Prerequisites: Introduction to Human Service (HSV 100); Models and Methods (HSV 220).
Delivered as an accelerated, hybrid course linked with HSV 305.

HSV 312. Death, Dying and Caregiving
3 hours
This course will offer an overview of the grief process and the common beliefs and myths about death and dying. This course will help students increase their awareness about the issues surrounding the death process and how grief impacts loved ones. Students will also have an opportunity to develop the ability to recognize situational grief reactions and secondary losses and explore effective helping interventions.
Prerequisites: Introduction to Human Service (HSV 100); Models and Methods (HSV 220).
Delivered as an online course.
Delivered as an accelerated, hybrid course linked with HSV 328.

HSV 319. Case Management
3 hours
This course will assist students in developing the skills associated with effective case management in a social service setting. Students will be required to complete a simulated case management project from initial screening to evaluation.
Prerequisites: Introduction to Human Service (HSV 100); Models and Methods (HSV 220).
Delivered as an online course.

HSV 328. Counseling the Chemically Dependent
3 hours
This course surveys three aspects of chemically dependency; namely the biological, Psychological and spiritual dimensions. The user and the family system will be studied. Practical counseling strategies will be explored. Special emphasis will be given to the JudeoChristian resources available to pastoral counselors.
Prerequisites: Theoretical Base of Counseling (HSV 305), and Clinical Counseling Skills (HSV 310).
Delivered as an accelerated, hybrid course.

HSV 342. Counseling for Sexual and Domestic Violence
3 hours
This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of counseling individuals and families impacted by sexual and domestic violence. The Psychological dimensions of rape, battering and other forms of sexual and domestic violence will be explored. Special attention will be given to treatment methods and the various roles of mental health counselors, pastoral counselors and criminal justice counselors in responding to offenders and victims.
Prerequisites: Introduction to Human Service (HSV 100); Models and Methods (HSV 220); Theoretical Base of Counseling (HSV 305); and Clinical Counseling Skills (HSV 310).
Delivered as an accelerated, hybrid course linked with HSV 420

HSV 350. Theological Skills for Human Services Professionals
3 hours
This course examines the philosophical, theological and clinical foundations of varied approaches to pastoral counseling and the framework for understanding pastoral counseling as a specialization within the mental health profession. Students will contract for and complete a field experience in an area of pastoral counseling of particular interest to him/her, i.e. bereavement, hospital chaplainry, parish ministry, pastoral counseling with the chemically dependent. (Formerly HSV 210) This course may be taken as a Religious Studies elective.
Prerequisites: Introduction to Human Service (HSV 100); Models and Methods (HSV 220); Theoretical Base of Counseling (HSV 305); and Clinical Counseling Skills (HSV 310).
Delivered as an accelerated, hybrid course.

HSV 358. Social Service and Public Policy
3 hours
The arena in which social service is practiced today usually has its boundaries set by rules and budgets developed through public mandates and its policies set by society standards. The student will review the changing standards of our society and study the changes in social policy that are incorporated to meet public policy. Both historical and current information will develop an understanding of the interrelationship between social service and social policy as well as the conflicts that do develop.
Delivered as an accelerated, hybrid course.

HSV 400. Crisis Intervention
3 hours
Students will be introduced to the various crisis intervention theories and models and the application toward various crises such as but not limited to, natural disaster, suicide, homicide, and domestic violence.
Delivered as an online course.

HSV 405. Counseling Diverse Populations
3 hours
This course will explore the special needs clients may present to the counselor during the treatment process. Students will examine how different forms of abuse, drug of choice, age, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity and culture must be considered in the treatment planning process. The aim is to assist the student in becoming more sensitive to the individualized needs of each client.
Delivered as an online course.

HSV 413. Methods in Community Organizations
3 hours
The organizer’s role in various stages of the problem-solving process is explicated, and factors influencing successful and unsuccessful interventions are examined. Although emphasis is placed on practical problems confronting community planners and organizers today, historical perspectives are reviewed for their significance in understanding current theoretical principles and practices.
Delivered as a weekend course on six Saturdays during the semester in which it is offered.

HSV 420. Group Dynamics
3 hours
This course will introduce students to: 1) the various theories of group counseling; 2) the stages of group development; 3) group dynamics; and 4) the various types of groups and the leadership roles they require.
Delivered as a hybrid course.

HSV 430. Assessment and Treatment Planning
3 hours
This course concentrates on the various screening and assessment tools available to the counselor. Although diagnosing a client is reserved for Master and Doctoral level clinicians, students will gain a working knowledge of the DSM IV classifications and multi axial assessment to enable the student to participate in the clinical staffing process. Students will learn to develop individualized treatment plans. Participants will be permitted to focus upon the criteria and disorders commonly associated with the student’s intended field of counseling.
Prerequisite: Introduction to Human Service (HSV 100); Models and Methods (HSV 220); Theoretical Base of Counseling (HSV 305), and Clinical Counseling Skills (HSV 310).
Delivered as a hybrid course.

HSV 495. Practicum
3 hours
This course will place students in an appropriate agency, depending on their concentration, in which they will be exposed to the work of that agency in a supervised setting. The program director, or an assigned instructor, will coordinate the students’ supervision by an experienced staff from the selected agency. This course may be repeated for up to a total of 6 hours. All students are required to complete a comprehensive exam as part of this course. The results of this exam do not influence the student's final grade. The results are used to assess the extent to which the student has mastered the objectives of the Human Services Program and assist in strengthening the Human Services curriculum. This exam will be coordinated by the program director in consultation with the faculty practicum supervisor.
Prerequisite: Senior status.

HSV 496. Topics in Human Services
1-3 hours
This course will examine topics of special interest in the human service field. Courses in pastoral counseling, criminal justice counseling and other areas of special interest will be as needed.

HSV 497. Research in Human Services
3 hours
By participating in a semester-long research program, students earn credit for their degree. Training in research methodology provides students with the opportunity to pursue this discipline by designing, implementing, and constructing a formal report on a research topic. This course requires senior status, a cumulative 3.25 index in the major, and the approval of the Program Director.

HSV 499. Senior Seminar in Human Services
3 hours
This capstone course is designed to assist students in the integration and critical examination of the various concepts, theories, and methods of inquiry presented both in general education and the major. Learning outcomes for both the general education program and the major are reviewed. Course assignments assist students in assessing the degree for which learning outcomes have been mastered.
This course may serve as an alternative to HSV 495 Practicum for students who have work experience in field and/or for students for whom this will strengthen their preparation for graduate school.
Senior standing is required.




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Jordan Osmond
Jordan Osmond