Human Services Program

CALUMET COLLEGE OF ST. JOSEPH’S HUMAN SERVICES PROGRAM OFFERS A FOUNDATION THAT SUPPORTS YOUR DREAM OF SERVICE TO OTHERS.

The Human Services Program prepares students to offer social and clinical interventions that will help individuals and groups achieve their highest level of functioning; exhibit sensitivity to the cultural and ethnic roots of human behavior; and consistently demonstrate a commitment to maintaining good mental health. All Human Services faculty offer personal and academic support to students as they work toward assuming the responsibilities of public services within a framework of a commitment to social justice.

The Human Services Program offers an A.S. Degree in Human Services and a B.S. in Human Services with two concentrations: Social Services and Counseling. With the approval of the Program Director, Counseling Concentrators may also design a clinical counseling specialization that more closely fits their professional interests or use the credit hours to complete a minor in another discipline.

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Career

Options

Career Options with this major include, but are not limited to work as:

  • Administration and Planning
  • Case Management
  • Advocacy
  • Program Evaluation
  • Policy Development
  • Volunteer Coordination
    Prevention
human-services-career-options

Faculty

Elizabeth Guzman-Arredondo, M.S.W., L.S.W

Program Director, Human Services; Assistant Professor

Take the first step toward a career in SERVICE PUBLIC AND SOCIAL

Program

Objectives and requirements

Upon completion of the Human Services Program, students will demonstrate mastery of the knowledge, skills and attitudes that characterize the Human Service Professional.

Origins and Theoretical Orientations of the Helping Professions: All students will be able to explain the origins of the human service profession, the value base of the profession and discuss issues that will impact its growth.

Theories and Techniques of Human Service Social and Clinical Interventions: All students will be able to identify and critically evaluate the major theories and techniques of social and clinical intervention and their relevance to the helping profession.

Systems Theory: All students will be able to apply a range of theories to explain human systems: families, small groups, organizations and social systems.

Social and Developmental Theory: All students will be able to apply medical, social and Psychological models of human behavior to identify the conditions that promote and impede attainment of optimal human functioning.

Basic Communication and Technology Literacy: All students will demonstrate competencies in literacy and technical writing, methods of research and measurement, and computer literacy.

Knowledge of and Respect for Cultural Diversity: All students will demonstrate cultural sensitivity and multi-cultural awareness.

The Twelve Core Functions of a Counselor/The Eight Counseling Skill Groups: Counseling students will demonstrate proficiency in the Twelve Core Functions of a Counselor and the Eight Counseling Skills Groups.

Community Organizing and Public Policy Development: Social Service students will demonstrate proficiency in the skills of community organization, the development of social policy and human service issues that are unique to urban environments.

Treatment Planning: All students will demonstrate proficiency in the strategies for planning and implementing social and clinical interventions.

Personal Growth and Commitment to Good Mental Health: All students will demonstrate a high level of personal self-awareness, an enhanced understanding of the mechanisms of social communication, increased awareness of inevitable sources of interpersonal conflict, and become more goal-oriented and strategic in their interactive behavior.

Working with Special Populations: Through completion of the various concentrations and specialties offered in the program students will demonstrate effective intervention skills with special populations: the bereaved, the chemically dependent, children, etc.

Critical Thinking and Analytical Skills: All students will demonstrate the full range of competencies in critical thinking and higher-order analysis necessary for the Human Services profession.

Professional Identity and Commitment to Life-Long Learning: Students will be able to articulate their identity as human service professionals and formulate a plan for on-going professional development.

Ethical Competence: Students will be familiar with the Codes of Ethics of the major professional organizations that regulate the helping professions and demonstrate consistent growth in their ability to comply with these standards.

120 credit hours

The following courses are required for a baccalaureate degree:

38 hours: General Education

15 hours: Requisites for the Major
HSV 100 Introduction to Human Services
HSV 220 Human Services Models and Methods
HSV 230 Pharmacology for Human Service Professionals
HSV 250 Human Services and Professional Issues
PSY 230 Statistics for Behavioral Sciences

42 hours: Upper Level Courses in Major

HSV 300 Family Dynamics
HSV 312 Death Dying and Caregiving
HSV 319 Case Management
HSV 350 Theological Skills for Human Service Professionals
HSV 358 Social Service and Public Policy
HSV 400 Crisis Intervention
HSV 405 Counseling Diverse Populations
HSV 420 Group Dynamics
HSV 413 Methods in Community Organizations
HSV 430 Assessment and Treatment Planning
HSV 495 Practicum
HSV 496 Topics in Human Services
HSV 497 Research in Human Services
An HSV elective at the 300 level or higher

25 hours: Electives

120 credit hours

The following courses are required for a baccalaureate degree:

38 hours: General Education

15 hours: Requisites for the Major
HSV 100 Introduction to Human Services
HSV 220 Human Services Models and Methods
HSV 230 Pharmacology for Human Service Professionals
HSV 250 Human Services and Professional Issues
PSY 230 Statistics for Behavioral Sciences

45 hours: Upper Level Courses in Major

HSV 300 Family Dynamics
HSV 312 Death Dying and Caregiving
HSV 319 Case Management
HSV 305 Theoretical Bases of Counseling
HSV 310 Clinical Counseling Practice
HSV 319 Case Management
HSV 328 Counseling the Chemically Dependent
HSV 342 Counseling for Sexual and Domestic Violence
HSV 350 Theological Skills for Human Service Professionals
HSV 400 Crisis Intervention (taken as part of the A.S. Degree)
HSV 405 Counseling Diverse Populations
HSV 420 Group Dynamics
HSV 430 Assessment and Treatment Planning
HSV 495 Practicum
HSV 496 Topics in Human Services
HSV 497 Research in Human Services
An HSV elective at the 300 level or higher

22 hours: Electives

62 credit hours

The following courses are required for an Associate’s degree:

35 hours: General Education

12 hours: Requisites for the Major
HSV 100 Introduction to Human Services
HSV 220 Human Services Models and Methods
HSV 230 Pharmacology for Human Service Professionals
HSV 250 Human Services and Professional Issues

45 hours: Upper Level Courses in Major
HSV 319 Case Management
HSV 400 Crisis Intervention (taken as part of the A.S. Degree)
HSV 420 Group Dynamics
HSV 496 Topics in Human Services
HSV ___  Human Services Elective

All students must meet the requirements for admission to the College.

The Human Services Program retains the right to recommend that students withdraw from the Human Services Program if they fail to demonstrate consistent progress toward the attainment of program objectives.  To continue in the program, students must earn a letter grade of a C for all major courses and maintain a 2.5 GPA.  Students who fall below this standard must follow the normal procedures for repetition of coursework.  Students may not have violated any of the commonly accepted ethical or moral standards of Human Service professions.  Students will receive written guidelines of all program requirements as part of the Introduction to Human Services course or during the course of their Application Interview.

It is expected that Human Services students will demonstrate consistent progress toward the completion of the degree.  The Human Services faculty is committed to making every effort to assist students in the attainment of this goal.

Human Services students are expected to demonstrate the standards of professional behavior commonly found in the various Codes of Professional Ethics.  This includes a commitment to developing and maintaining the personal growth and development needed to function effectively in the helping professions, as well as academic honesty and integrity. Students who demonstrate serious levels of personal impairment will be asked to consult with the Program Director.  Every effort will be made to provide students with the support they need to meet this standard of personal fitness for the profession.  Students who are unable to meet these ethical standards will not be allowed to continue in the Human Services Program.

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at Calumet College of St. Joseph!